What Effortless Office Learned When They Went From… | CustomerGauge What Effortless Office Learned When They Went From CSAT to Account Experience

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What Effortless Office Learned When They Went From CSAT to Account Experience

Imagine walking into the office tomorrow and your CEO is waiting for you in your office.

"We just lost an account. No warning. No signals. Just gone. How did we not see this coming?"

You have nothing. You check with the account manager and they are just as blindsided by the news as you are. You go into the system and the customer has never complained or sent any bad feedback. There are no signs to be found that the customer was ready to churn. So how were you to prevent it? If you're only running transactional CSAT surveys when customers open a ticket the answer is, you can't.

This is exactly what happened to Leif Cederblom, Director of CX at Effortless Office. Leif reached out to CustomerGauge on the second Friday of December 2020. 

"Guys, I know we've been talking for months, but I just lost a customer. I have the green light to get our NPS® program rolling and I want to unveil the results from our first survey at our VR holiday party next week." 

You heard that right. they wanted to onboard CustomerGauge, send our their first relational survey and get the results posted all in less than a week!

Short story short, the deadline was achieved and they got their program launched in 4 days and got their first-ever NPS score of 44.

Effortless Office was running transactional surveys with CSAT. But the problem was, customers were rating the service agent's ability to fix the problem, not the companies performance as a whole. So what was happening was the service agent was able to fix the problem, which led to a positive score, but the same problem would occur over and over, leading to frustration with the company. Effortless Office had a respectable CSAT of 98.4, but it wasn't telling the right story to management. After only four months and two relational surveys, they are already seeing huge results. 

When they moved to sending relational NPS surveys, the respondents were no longer rating a single transaction with customer service–they were rating the overall experience with the company. The switch from opinion (we think our customers are happy) to data (we know which customers need attention) completely changed the way Effortless Office was able to prioritize their efforts.

So the big takeaway here is don't rely on transactional CSAT scores to tell the story of your customer's experience with your brand. You can't even rely solely on word of mouth from your account managers, because they don't always know the full story. 

Leif
One of our clients came back and didn't have a great NPS score, in our NPS Lifecycle Chart in CustomerGauge. They were in our red zone, right, and they were on the, you know, they were in the 80% of our large revenue, you know, our big customer in our red zone, but I remember the service delivery manager saying, "Oh, like, that surprises me. Every time I talk to the manager, he's like, 'Oh, everything's great,' right, and really, but his score on NPS was not that high," and so it kind of revealed, like, oh, wow, I didn't even realize that this client was as unhappy as they are. ♪ Hey, hey ♪ ♪ Hey, hey, hey, hey ♪
Ian
Hello, everyone, and welcome back to another episode of "The Account Experience Podcast." I am here as always with my cohost, Cary T. Self. Say hello, Cary.
Cary
Hello, everyone.
Ian
And today, guys, we have another fantastic customer on the podcast. We welcome Leif Cederblom. He's the director of CX at Effortless Office. How you doing today, Leif?
Leif
I'm doing great, guys. Glad to be here.
Ian
We're excited to have you, and I know, just to dive right in, Cary has this really great story about, like, our first interaction with Effortless Office and with you, so I'm gonna kick it right over to Cary to tell that story.
Cary
It's one of the unique things we're gonna do here is start at this point and then tell your whole story, but it's late in December, close to the end of the year, and we get a phone call, and it's like we have a company who needs us, but there's a catch: they need us in a couple of days, and I'm thinking, "Okay, this is gonna be interesting," and I think it was, like, three days we had, if I'm not mistaken, of a window, but it's like no, they really need us to send their first survey out by, like, Wednesday of next week. It was Friday, and so of course, we're like, "We'll give it a shot," but I think the question all of us were asking is why the sense of urgency? What happened that caused someone that we've been talking to for a bit though to say, "No, no, no, we need you by next Wednesday. We'll put our name on that contract, and we'll do it." So Leif, that's where I'm gonna turn it over to you. What the hell was going on the third week of December that there was such a quick turnaround, and we wanted to get you up and running so fast?
Leif
I think it became, it was the second week of December that you guys got that call from us saying, "Hey, let's do this quick," and it was the third week of December we actually got the survey out and got our results, and so we have quarterly rocks, how we organize our business, right, our, you know, quarterly project goals. We call them rocks, and you know, I had, one of my rocks was to get an NPS score, and you know, and honestly, like, going into the end of the year, we didn't have the budget for this, right, so the idea of, you know, the not insignificant investment that CustomerGauge requires was just, like, it wasn't in my realm of possibility. So I was literally, you know, I was in the process of, it's like Salesforce had told us you could do it, you know, you could do customer surveys with Salesforce, and it's the old Salesforce like yeah, you could do it on their platform, but if you wanna really do it right, you're buying another plugin much like CustomerGauge and, you know, and integrating it, right? They're a very basic tool for doing surveys, which is what they said would work, right. So I was planning on doing an MVP rollout, and that's when I got a call from our CEO saying, "Hey, we just got notice from one of our clients that they're leaving. You know, how did we not see this coming?" And I'm asking myself, "How did we not see this coming?" And what it, you know, what it was was it was a, it was one of our clients that was, you know, one of these kind of, just, quiet clients. They, you know, really hadn't been, engagement had been low, right, and the false assumption is that if engagement is low, everything is good. That's a false assumption, right, as you guys know, and you know, all of a sudden, we're getting notice that, you know, they're leaving and, you know, and you got, you know, 100-plus clients, you know, the truth is the squeaky ones get the grease, and so here's the quiet one that just, like, kind of, you know, overnight, there's just like all of a sudden, you know, but that, you know, that $4,000 a month client or, you know, with the $2,000 a month clients, you know, over years, that's, you know, that's one of our, you know, it becomes a salary of one of our techs. You know, it's, like, not an insignificant amount of money. So that's kind of, it's like I had the project on my radar, the pain came up, and the cool thing is our CEO is very customer-experienced. Like, he, I kind of introduced the language of customer experience as opposed to customer service, but he's always been white glove customer service. I mean, it's just been part of our ethos as a company. So it really came down to, it became the right timing 'cause he came to me, basically, saying, "How do we get ahead of this?" And I had already been talking to Clark for months, knowing that I didn't have the budget, that it wasn't gonna be something I could roll forward with, and I said, "Well, I already have the solution," and it was just, you know, and it became, CustomerGauge made it easy. You know, there was, frankly, there was language in your guys' quote wrapper about, "We guarantee it." It's like, "If after you guys sign up with us, you're not totally satisfied, you'd have a certain amount of time to pull out of the contract," right. So it made it very easy. It's like that and the fact that you guys basically said, "Hey, sure, we'll help you," right, and just that first survey, like, immediately after putting out that first survey, as soon as you see the results, the results speak for themselves, right, but it's that whole, that how do you, how you gotta get somebody to get the results before there are actually clients, which are, you know, I hear, you know, it's like you guys have actually put together a little strategy like this, where it's like, "Hey, how can you, how can you just, like, spit out one relational survey?" Because honestly, the amount of effort that it took for Brandon to get us spun up. He was really good. He got us spun up really quick. We got these results really quick. One relational survey alone almost pays for the value of, you know, of a year's worth of service. 'Cause we were already collecting a customer satisfaction score, which was really a user satisfaction score through our ticketing system. So every time somebody opens a ticket, every time they open a ticket, they get a survey saying, "You know, did we do good? Thumbs up, thumbs down," and we were doing really well in our customer satisfaction score. I mean, our customer satisfaction score for 2020 was 98.2%. I mean, very, very strong from a numbers perspective, right, but it wasn't strong from a learning perspective. You know, that 1.8% of feedback, it's like wasn't bringing us a lot of feedback, right. So there wasn't a lotta learning happening from that number. It's a great number to be able to put out there, but in terms of actually improving what we're doing, it wasn't really helping all that much, so the CE approached me and basically said, "Hey, you know, this just happened. How do we, how do we get ahead of these in the future?" And that's where I said, "Well, that's where we should have a more affordable NPS program, and we should be using a more, you know, an actual NPS software to do this so that, like, you don't hit us outta left field," you know, and the reality is, out of our, you know, 100-plus clients, you know, 100-plus active clients, it's like what are the, what are the 20% we should be focusing on that are most at risk? We didn't have a good insight into that, and again, our customer satisfaction score or getting out our tickets wasn't a good measure of that, so it was, the quickness came because this is already a rock of mine. We had a, we had our holiday party coming up in a week, and part of my goal was to present our NPS results as part of our holiday party, and I think the holiday party's actually an important element of this, of the timing, because 2020 was an interesting year for us all, right. So after essentially being cooped up in our home offices for a year, I had gone to the company and said, "Hey," you know, 'cause part of my roles here is not just our customer experience but our employee experience as well, but I'd gone to the company and said, "Guys, you know, we always have a holiday party. Obviously, it does not make sense for us to get the entire company together in a bar in Vegas because, you know, we couldn't survive if, you know, more than a couple people were out sick all at the same time, so let's do a virtual party," and of course, everybody's like, "Ugh, a virtual party, that doesn't sound very cool." I was like, "No, we're gonna do something cool," and I worked with some folks to put together a party in virtual reality. We held a party in alt space. We rented headsets for the entire company and shipped people, you know, for the weekend these VR headsets, and, you know, had 50 people show up to a virtual reality party, so that was the party we had planned, and I was going to be, you know, my goal was to be, gotta be able to say as part of this, like, "Hey, guys, you know, we have an NPS score now, and we're, you know, we're kind of," to show progress, right. Like, part of, part of this, part of a good NPS program's just, it's progress over perfection, right. It's like, you know, the goal is not to get to a NPS of 100. The goal is to continually just show progress, and so I was part of kind of the emotional experience, and we were allowed to end 2020 on a bang and be able to say, "Hey, we got our NPS score." So all of a sudden, I had kind of an urgency of timing both from a, "I'm trying to get this project done. We wanna roll it off to the company," and we had just experienced this pain, so it's kind of, there was just this perfect mix of the, really of our CEO being able to connect the dots and say, "Hey, like, this is, yeah, I don't know how we'll pay for it just yet. We'll figure it out. Let's do it," and then the other part of this is that, you know, CustomerGauge, the way you guys responded, it's kinda like, "Well, normally, normally we don't kick people off that fast, and we'll figure out how to fast-track you. Yeah, we'll get you up and running," and then the other part of it was that CustomerGauge had almost to get a little bit of a tangent inside point, you know, your guys' sales process and just that closing of the sales process. You guys made it really easy. It was like, "Hey, you know, just kinda sign on the dotted line. We'll get you started. We'll get you results before you even put any money into our bank account," right, and the truth is, once those results came in, there was no question of the value of this program. There's, like, instantly, everybody understood the value because that voice of the customer, you'll actually see what customers are saying in their language, hear their pain or hear their pleasure, you know, and really, as soon as you see those results, it speaks for itself, and so it was, you know, that combination of factors, and the cool part about the, going back to the holiday party, we actually made a little poster in our virtual world we put up on the wall in kind of our main lobby of our virtual space, and it showed our 2019 versus 2020 stats, and for our 2019 stats for our NPS score, I had question mark, question mark, and for 2020, we were able to put up our, you know, first NPS score of 44, and it was just this, it was a subtle little thing, and honestly, at that point, most of the people in my company didn't even know what NPS was, right. So that was their, that was their intro to NPS. It was, like, arriving to this one, like, totally, you know, we basically popped a bunch of people's VR cherries, and it was pretty cool. So I had them arrive and to, like, have this VR experience for their first time, and then look up on the wall and see this, like, custom graphic that was effortless graphic and, you know, and have that be our introduction to NPS, it was cool. It was really cool, and the results of that survey, again, just, like, the wisdom we were getting from our CSAT engagement that was really a user, you know, a user experience, you know, a user experience for people who are engaging with us and having issues actually using us, the learnings we were getting were just not even in the same ballpark as the level of learning we got from that first NPS survey.
Cary
 Well, Leif, I wanna dive in 'cause there was a lot to unpack there, a lot, but I do wanna step back just one minute to help everyone understand. What is Effortless Office? Tell me a little bit about what it is that you guys do, and I think that'll help paint a picture when we start answering these next couple of questions and where we're going with the program.
Leif
Understood, so Effortless Office is a national managed services provider, so we are essentially a, you could think of us in other ways as an IT partner or outsource IT partner, so companies hire us to do their IT for them. Now, what makes us unique in the space is both that we kinda have a national footprint and that we have essentially our own private cloud, so we have a nationally redundant private cloud, a.k.a. like Amazon's AWS or Microsoft's Azure, where we're able to bring clients, and really, the way that technology is transitioning, CustomerGauge. I mean, CustomerGauge is in the cloud, right. I can log in to CustomerGauge from wherever I have access to a browser. That kind of ability to leverage the internet with local operations is where we have a hybrid approach to IT that allows us to, it just, it's kind of the new way that IT is going. There's a bunch of benefits, I mean, just, you know, for instance, you know, off-site backups, right, where whatever data you've got going on locally is being stored in the cloud somewhere. That's where we have our own private cloud, so it's really kind of our combination of the technology backbone and technology infrastructure that we invested in to be able to have this capability with our kind of boots on the ground managed services approach, and further, I think the other thing that I would point to is a lot of technology companies focus on technology. We, you know, QuickTech, BesTech, you know. It's like CloudTech, whatever. They're focused on the technology. From its inception, Effortless has always been very focused on that customer service. We always knew that customer service was what separated us from our competitors. In other words, we're not really selling any unique technology. We are ultimately supporting, you know, really market-prevalent technologies, so our differentiator is not in so much the technology as in how we support that technology, and that's been part of our DNA, and that's why our name is Effortless Office because in our brand, we are essentially talking about our number one, my mentor in the CX world calls it do for. What do we do for our clients, right? Well, our number one do for is we make technology effortless, and so it's just it's part of our DNA. Like, CX is really, it's already part of our brand, and it's one of our differentiators, and it's one of the things that we'll continue to really focus on as our, as how we deliver excellent service is really, and what's cool is that as our maturity in CX has grown, we've actually really gone from thinking of ourselves as a technology company to thinking of ourselves as a CX company that just happens to deliver technology, which is such a cool, I mean, that's a huge, like, mental shift, but it's so cool to see happening.
Cary
I think anyone who's ever sat at their desk on day one where a new system is rolled out, and you know it's not working, and you call over the IT department, and they treat you like you're a complete idiot, it's so nice to have service up front of what you guys do, and again, getting on the phone with anyone from your team or working with you guys, you feel that right outta the gate. So it sound like there's this service culture that was already in place of what you guys are providing as a solution, right. Let's be honest: nowadays, everybody needs, you know.
Leif
Yeah, yeah, and I really have to give credit to our CEO. He has been, you know, has been, he actually talks about it from the perspective of he's a really smart guy, and you know, he got his MCSE. He's, you know, MCSE, Microsoft-certified engineer, and I'm forgetting the exact, but he was an engineer, but he talks about, like he got into engineering and technology and IT not so much because he liked IT. He liked business. He loves business, and he sees how technology empowers business. So his, that's been his philosophy ever since he got started, was that it's really not about the technology. It's about supporting the business, and so that's one of the ways we were able to move quickly was that when the connection of the pain point and the solution became really tangibly, you know, when it became tangible, like, here's the pain, and here's the solution, he already was bought in. You know, that's one of the things that I've noticed in, you know, I'm kind of appreciating where I'm at. It's that a lotta companies, the first step of customer experience is to, like, go try and make the case for a value of spending on customer experience. You're essentially having to, like, start from scratch and say, "Hey, here's why customer experience is important." He already got that, so it's like honestly, that's one of the reasons we were able to move so fast is we had already crossed that chasm of understanding the value, and it was just like pain, solution, bam, let's go.
Ian
And I'm kind'a curious, so Leif, you talk about having that C-level buy-in right away, which, you're 100% right. We talked to a lotta companies, and that is the biggest struggle. So that is a very nice situation to have, and you talked about rolling it out very quickly to get it for the party, to react to the pain, which, by the way, Cary, we need a virtual Fourth of July party coming up.
Cary
Yeah, I'm already reaching out to a few companies.
Ian
Okay, good.
Cary
While we're doing this.
Ian
My question is, like, with such speed, right, how do you get the rest of the company on board with this? Like, I'm guessing you had sales reps that were getting feedback from certain accounts and things like that. How did you kinda manage that process?
Leif
Well, it's actually, even so, I wanna hit on the topic of sales reps because really, it's actually, we haven't even rolled this out really to the sales-facing side, you know, the precustomer side of the experience yet. At this point, it's all, you know, we've done two quarterly relational surveys to our client base. One of the things that makes Effortless unique is how we structure our service delivery department. So we essentially have service delivery teams where each team, as opposed to having every one of our agents have to know all 100 customers, we've broken them up. So now, you know, each team only has to know their subset of customers, which provides for a better customer experience, so it's those teams are headed by a service delivery manager, who are actually very high-level, very skilled. They're almost like virtual CIOs or virtual CTOs. They're very high-level, skilled folks. They are the ones who are really, I mean, we've actually changed their commission structure or their kinda bonus structure to actually weight our NPS score into this. So we've really put them in the, you know, we almost didn't need to go wide to the whole company. It's like there were a couple people that just needed to really understand this process, the tool, and you know, to create that value. So those, so that's really where it started, was being able to roll it out to our service delivery managers, show them the results. You know, all of a sudden, for them to be able to open up their client base, I mean, there's a quote from this, and I remember this distinctly. It's like one of our clients came back and didn't have a great NPS score. In our NPS Lifecycle Chart in CustomerGauge, they are in our red zone, right, and they were on the, you know, they're in the 80% of our large-revenue, you know, our basically big customer in our red zone, but I remember the service delivery manager saying, "Oh, like, that surprises me. Every time I talk to the manager, he's like, 'Oh, everything's great,'" right, and really, but his score on NPS was not that high, and so it kind of revealed, like, "Oh, there's, wow, I didn't even realize that this client was as unhappy as they are," and so it's been really through our service delivery managers that that's been rolling out, but with now, you know, it's now something that's, you know, almost the leadership of our service delivery teams are being, our NPS scores one of their top metrics that they're aiming for for the quarter, and it's, what is happening in terms of language, and what this has done, is it's really started to make people aware of how their little actions, you know, kinda roll up to a bigger picture, and at the same time, there's a lot more work to be done here. I mean that's part of my next steps is really to continue marketing this knowledge internally to help people understand how every little interaction, you know, goes towards, you know, it makes a difference.
Ian
But I love that shift, and you guys have already done, in my opinion, the hard part, which is shifting from opinions to data, so- And I remember this. Actually, I heard this a lot because we talked to, like, clients like AB InBev that have this exact same epiphany, that is, if you asked the sales rep how the account is, everybody's like, "Yeah, good. No, it's all solid. It's locked away," and then once you get this data flowing in, you're like, "Oh, wow. Okay, there's actually some cracks in the foundation there. Interesting," then like you said, 80% of your revenue, if you didn't kinda get that data in, you would still be talking to that sales rep of, like, "How's the account going?" And they would still be giving you the thumbs up. It's all okay, and I think that's, that alone is just a powerful process to go through, not just for you guys, but for many companies out there, just not even using CG, right, like, just getting that data in versus relying on opinions of people, I think, is really transformational sometimes for a lotta companies.
Leif
So I wanna jump off on that topic real quick because there's a guy who I, who I have a lotta admiration for, a guy named WE Deming, who is, like, the godfather of bringing Japanese manufacturing principles to the US and, you know, kinda leading manufacturing and whatnot. One of his, you know, basic concepts is the plan, do, act cycle, and that's where so many of us- I mean, so many of us just do, right. Like, we don't even do with a plan. So if you just start by planning and then doing, it's gonna be that much better, but we fail, I mean, just across the board to do that check and act cycle. Right, it's like after you've rolled it out, now, let's go measure to see how it's doing, and then let's revise, right, and that iterative design cycle, that's what the best companies in the world do, and that's where CustomerGauge, you know, has really helped us with that, you know, the check and act cycle, and it's revealing some things that we didn't, if we didn't have the visibility that CustomerGauge has given us, honestly, I'm not sure that we'd be seeing some of those patterns. I mean, I just have, like, a really low-hanging fruit. This last survey we just did, where somebody said, "Hey, I'm getting too many emails from you guys. When I have an issue and I go to you guys, I'm getting too many emails from you guys," and you know, that's one user pointing out that issue. Well, that's every person who's opening a ticket is having that issue, right. The fix was so easy, I mean, like, ridiculously easy in terms of how much effort it took us to fix that pattern, but in terms of the ripple effect of what that did for our clients, I mean, it's, you know, huge ROI, huge ROI from one little comment, and you just never know. I mean, that's that thing, is I literally, I'm going through all these comments, and there's, like, just gem after gem after gem of insights that I just wouldn't have had otherwise, that we wouldn't have had otherwise.
Cary
But I like the contrast also that you made from earlier, where in the satisfaction score, we look like rockstars sitting at 98, and now, we roll out this relationship component, and there's this whole gap of you're not hearing from anyone. There's, like, this absence of signal. Fast-forward it now to, like, you're getting feedback that you wouldn't have gotten from a satisfaction score. You know, you're getting all these little nuggets that you can act on. I love that contrast and that difference, and who in the hell in this world celebrates going from a perception of a 98 perfect score to a 44 your first time out, and everyone's, like, cheering? I love that. So it's real, actionable data, which I think is just an amazing part to hear from you. So let me put this in perspective for a lot of the listeners too. Most companies come to us, and it takes us as long as it took you to roll out two relationship surveys, usually to get to their first, and you guys have just recently gone with your second relationship survey. So what have you learned? What was the difference between the first and the second one?
Leif
Our first survey, just, you know, the data. Our first survey, we came back with a score of 44 and an engagement, or a response rate, of 11%, which, according to Brandon, who, by the way, a shout-out to Brandon. He has been amazing. You know, Brandon was, like, "Hey, this is actually, you know, like, these are pretty darn good scores, guys. Like, for your first time out, like, this is, you know, this is not too shabby," and so just the data there, 44 and an 11% response rate. On the second one, we came back with a 52 and a 10% response rate. So you know, what did we learn? Again, it's like some of those little insights that, what ends up happening, I think, is that at some point, you know, one, from kinda comparing it to our old process of the customer satisfaction score survey, right. Like, that happens after every ticket, so in some ways, I think people get, you know, like, fatigue, and they just stop, you know, they just stop inputting, and I think it's also that there's a, you know, part of it is that if you look at it from the, you know, from a customer journey perspective, right, that one issue that I- All right, it's Monday morning. I open up my computer. Something isn't right. I call up Effortless and say, "Hey, I need your help." You know, we have really, really talented agents. Agent fixes the problem. Like, awesome, I'm stoked that the problem was fixed. Issue is that problem keeps happening, you know, over a couple weeks. So maybe they've had to call in for the same issue three weeks out of the, you know, out of the month, right. So each touch is a good experience, and the customer's saying, "Hey, thank you, agents. I really appreciate the agents," but really, underneath it, they're like, "Man, I'm frustrated I have to keep, you know, coming to you guys." There's just a, there's a difference almost between the relational, the quarterly, like, the mentality of somebody filling out the survey, besides the fact that the survey format is different and kind of encourages, encourages, you know, both the essentially the drivers of why the score as well as the open comment, but I think it's just, for whatever reason, we got more constructive feedback during the quarterly than we were getting from our CSAT. So you know, what has it kind of driven, and what have we learned? So one of the cool things is that, you know, now we had NPSs per team. So we set up, you know, and we did our survey. We made it so that, you know, we could segment our results by our service delivery teams, and so it's very interesting to see- You know, we had one team, one of our teams our first quarter came back with an NPS of 71 and, like, very, you know, statistically significant results. I mean, so they just crushed it on their first survey. One of our teams came back with an NPS of zero, right. Like, not where we want them to be, and I think that's another thing that kind of- We really hadn't, even our lowest team was still at a, like, a very high customer satisfaction score, but then they came back with a much lower score during the NPS, and there's a couple reasons I think, again, because one, you have the individual interaction. Individual interactions, you know, don't look well. You wanna give that, you know, agent thumbs up, you know. It's almost like you know the agents are being, you know, ranked on this, and you know you're gonna be calling the agent again next week. You wanna give 'em a thumbs up 'cause they're, you might need their help again, but that's where the quarterly kind of reveals some of that. Like, "Ugh, the interaction was good, but guys, I'm having to call you too often," and that's been one of our pieces of feedback, right. It's like, hey, there's almost underlying things that, you gotta look at these patterns, but here's the other thing I think is really important to point out. We just had a client come back, actually our lowest-scoring team, so in terms of our difference between 44 and 52, all of our teams showed improvements from last quarter to this quarter, and frankly, part of that's just straight-up saying, "You're being," you know, "You're now being ranked on these kinds of things, and you should be paying attention to these kinds of things," right, and so I think just purely the awareness that, like, this is something that they're gonna be, you know, that it's gonna be going out at the end of the quarter, and they're gonna be getting ranked on, I think was, you know, a part of it, but our lowest-ranked team, really interesting insights. In this last, this last iteration, you know, they went from a zero to a 10, so we're seeing positive direction, right? It's like progress, not perfection, but one of the interesting data points is that when we segregated the results by our job level, a.k.a. our sponsors. You know, it's kind of sponsors, the VIPs, to our customers, a.k.a. our managers, kinda frontline. I'm using ITIL terms, which are, you know, computer terms, technology terms. So you've got your sponsor, the person who's paying for it; your manager, the person who's actually kinda responsible for the consumption of services, making people are using services properly, your, you know, IT manager; and then you've got your end users. For this low-scoring team, we looked at okay, well, how did we do for, you know, with sponsors versus the managers, versus the, you know, end users, and a very interesting thing came back. You know, our end users had an NPS of, like, 37. You know, it's actually not that bad, but our managers and our sponsors, you know, had a much lower score, essentially offsetting that score, so there's, it reveals to us partly that we have a perception issue. We're not doing a good enough job letting 'em know how good of a job we're doing, right, and they don't honestly have the internal, you know, it's like in some ways, we need to help close that gap for them and show them the data. This happened with one of our clients, one of our clients that's end of 2020 was, like, really kind of on fire, unhappy, the very, very high-needs client, I'll just put it like that, and 2021 quarter one, we really had put a lotta effort into getting them stable, making them happy, and the, again, the manager there, the person who's really responsible, spearheading on their end, has been, you know, kind of focused on the negative, and there's, I think, a little bit of just maybe a personality thing there, where it's just like that's- You know, you're kind of a glass is half full or glass is half empty kind of person, and it's just the way the world and the human experience is, right, and I think maybe, you know, maybe she's focused more on the negative. Well, when we actually got our results, this score for that client was, like, a 55, and that's really very positive, especially kind of given where they were coming to, their old IT experience compared to coming to us. Like, their old IT experience of just, you know, kind of fire after fire after fire, so for us to be able to now go to that manager, who's been, you know, who's been, again, maybe a little more focused on kind of what wasn't working than what was working, and be able to say, "Hey, by the way, though, your users really think this is working." We do a, we do a quarterly business review with all of our clients. I just got word from a service delivery manager just this week. He did a service, you know, he did his quarterly review with that client. That client came back, and we were able to present these results, and that manager, who's been, you know, a little challenging, came back and was, like, so stoked on, you know, on their QBR process, seeing this data, knowing we're collecting data at this level. It's like all of a sudden, her perception shifted as to how well we're doing because we had the data to say, "Hey, this is not opinion-based anymore. This is, you know, this is now fact." So another quote by this guy Deming, that I really love, is he said, "In God we trust. All others, bring data." And that's what we're doing. That's what we're doing.
Cary
Something tells me this is not the last time we're gonna talk to you. I think, I think we're gonna be talking to you really soon again to hear where you're at, but I do wanna ask this question 'cause you're still kind of new to CustomerGauge with this new program, and I'm sure there's a lotta plans, but I guess everyone's curious. What next? Where do you go now? You've done your second relationship survey. You're getting comfortable with the tool, and you're seeing the value in it. Where does Effortless Office go next?
Leif
Sure, so at this point, we've been doing our quarterly relational, so just those alone have really yielded such value. Where we are going next is really getting this tied into some automation, so we recently invested in Salesforce, and Salesforce is, you know, it's not an insignificant undertaking in terms of, you know, what it takes to get that set up and whatnot, and as we are looking at essentially having CustomerGauge be able to, you know, directly pull that data out of Salesforce as opposed to us kinda manually uploading the data right now, we realize that we have to go back to our business process. Like, basically there's places where our business process needs to be re-engineered. Once we've outlined those business processes on paper, kinda, again, done to plan, they will actually implement that in Salesforce so that now, now our customer journey has kind of some more automation in terms of, you know, they're at this step. These are the tasks that get created. You get moved to this step; these are the tasks that get created, et cetera. So our goal now is to really hone in on the process of onboarding, so you know, when a client comes on board, you know, there's a intense, you know, one to three-month, you know, transferring of their, you know, a migration, basically, taking their kind of old solution and bringing it into, you know, us getting our arms around it, bringing it to our environment, and that process is something we really want to go, we wanna look at in detail, so at this point, we are looking to put in some transactional touchpoints that corresponds to our onboarding process and really, you know, get a sense of, you know, right after the sales process, right after the client kickoff call, how are we doing right out the gate? How are we doing? You know, and that's gonna give us kind of a reflection looking backwards on the whole sales process, and it's gonna help us know, you know, right off the bat, 'cause it's kind of like, a metaphor is if you're one or two degrees off, at first, you don't notice that, it's not you don't have enough distance to notice that being off, right, but at two degrees off, after, you know, a while, then you're a, you know, big distance off, and so our ability to, like, touch in right at the beginning and say, "Hey, are we, you know, are we totally in alignment?" And begin to fix things. If there's not perfect alignment right up front, now we can kind of tweak it and fix it right then, and you know, so just really focusing in on our customer onboarding process is where we are aiming for next.
Ian
I think that's smart. Cary actually had a quote. "What is the last-" Cary, you said something along the lines of, "Churn, whether it be employee or customer, happens, you know, within the first piece of onboarding." It basically sets the tone for the entire relationship, so I think focusing on that onboarding piece is really smart, and I think transactional touchpoints throughout the process, it's gonna provide a ton of data for you guys to pore through, which will be really interesting, I'm sure.
Leif
So that gets us to data, right, but the other part of it is the internal marketing of the data to my employees so that they understand, right, and the great part about this is I now have data for our boys in the customer program because I've all these quotes, and so that's the other part of this is continuing to really systematize this into our culture such that our employees really, and it just, there's something about hearing it from the perspective, you know, through a customer's language, that really makes it tangible, so that's the other part of this, so just continuing to, like, internally market this through a voice of the customer program and really through understanding our customer journey, our customer lifecycle, et cetera. I'm passionate about this stuff. Like, I think this is just such cool, you know, yeah, I mean, that's- Honestly, the title Director of CX is, like, I gave myself that title. I'm doing so many other things, but that's where I said, like, "This is what's important to us as a company, and that's where I wanna be in future." What's awesome is that this data also is, you know, just as a little side sower, maybe has planted the seed for a future topic. We committed in 2020- I mean, when this whole pandemic hit, our technology, you know, our technology allows people to work from anywhere. They can log in to their computer securely from anywhere. So not only were we as a company able to essentially snap our fingers. When Vegas came back, it was like, "Hey, we're closing down." Soon as we got news that that happened, we snapped our fingers and said, "Okay, everybody works from home tomorrow," and it went off without a hitch, like, no, no issues, and all of our clients, you know, all of our clients got the benefit of not seeing, you know, that same thing. Well, it became so, we proved as a company we could continue working through a remote work, you know, through a remote work setup, and we actually made a commitment as a company to continue with our remote work, you know, I mean frankly, you get rid of a giant office building, and you know, downsize it to a kind of an executive office and empower everybody to work from home. We were able to do that, and we were able to make that commitment as a company because we have this data. Like, if we didn't have this data, there's the, you know, there's the old mentality as a company of, like, "Ah, I can tell people are working 'cause they're in their seats," right, but once you have this data and you just start holding people accountable for results, we actually get to empower this, like, this revolution of remote work that I am equally passionate about, so plant a good story for another time, or plant a seed for another time.
Cary
Exciting to hear your story, and like I said, I think this is the first installment of multiple times we're gonna meet with you in here and be able to tell your story.
Leif
I'd love to be able to report progress, you know. Hold me accountable.
Ian
There you go. We'll have you back for sure.
Leif
You guys are, you guys are partners in my success.
Ian
So Leif, thank you so much for joining us. Again, Leif is the Director of CX at Effortless Office. What an amazing story. Again, I hope you guys got as much value as we do outta these stories, guys. Thank you for listening. Leif, thanks again for being here, and we'll talk to everybody soon.
Leif
Appreciate the opportunity, guys, and really, I'm stoked for what Customer Gauge do for us, so.

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